Greenwich Community Artist Exhibition

Greenwich Community Artists Series

The Greenwich Historical Society launched the Community Artists Series in March 2010. The program features selected artists who work in a variety of media and highlights examples of their work that complement themes of the Historical Society's rotating exhibitions.

Art has always been a major focus for the Greenwich Historical Society, whose Bush-Holley House in Cos Cob was a cradle for American Impressionism and the inspiration for prominent American artists such as Childe Hassam, John Henry Twachtman, J. Alden Weir, Elmer MacRae and Genjiro Yeto. As a renewed commitment to this artistic legacy, the Community Artists Series has been established to support and encourage contemporary local artists by offering a welcoming venue for the exhibition of their work in a unique and historic setting.

Inheriting the Impressionist Tradition

June 5 through July 31, 2013

With still lifes and landscapes rendered in colorful painterly strokes, the group’s paintings define themselves as “Inheriting the Impressionist Tradition" and represent a modern reflection on American impressionism, which evolved at the Cos Cob art colony early in the last century. Margaret Esme Simon, Maria C. Friscia, and Perry Robinson, MD have put together a show that is in sync with both the season and the artistic legacy of Bush-Holley Historic site.

Open Wednesday through Sunday, noon to 4:00 pm

Storehouse Gallery Museum Shop
39 Strickland Road, Cos Cob, CT

Admission is free.

Opening Reception, June 5, 2013, 6:00 to 8:00 pm
To attend the opening, please call 203-869-6899, Ext. 10


Artists’ Statements

Maria C. Friscia

Naturewalk Maria C Friscia

Naturewalk, 16" x 20", oil on canvas

Nature frees me from all onuses of life, and when looking at landscapes, I find myself concentrating on the “self”–-that which is to me the spirit, the soul of being. Through investigating nature, I am compelled to understand myself and reflect on my role and purpose of being.  Art and philosophy are one during this engaging time of observing nature and creating a landscape while painting.  During this creative process I am in constant touch with my inner feelings.  The woods, the hills, the cliffs, the water–these are all motifs for inspiration and reflection of a particular experience.

Perry Robinson

Perry-Robinson,MD, Summer Jardiniere

Summer Jardiniere, 11" x 14", oil on canvas

Plein air oil painting is about emotion, passion and the need to play. It is the ultimate endeavor in freedom of expression, observation and the joy of God’s great natural creation. It is the joy of light and dark, harmony and tension, but especially it is about the joy of color. Each of the paintings in this exhibition were completed in single two-to-three-hour sessions and represent new compositional and color explorations and challenges at that point in time. I rarely repaint a scene or edit a painting once it is completed in the field. While some things may be “corrected”, re-painting often creates new issues, and the work loses its original vitality.

Margaret Esmé Simon

margaret esme simon five pears II

Five Pears II, 11" x 14", oil on canvas board

As far back as I can remember I have created art. As a young child I painted; at five, I built a skyscraper of Lincoln Logs and announced, “I want to build buildings.” I became an architect and designed buildings, [and] all the while I painted and drew. In 2008, economic downturn in full swing, I decided, “I want to paint.”

Composition is the starting point. It is abstract, the layout of the forms, both solid and void. That is the case even if the subject is a figure or a still life. When there is color, it can make a painting sing. I work to combine these elements and to draw the viewer into the painting.