Valentine’s Day Letter 1898

Valentine's Day card Below is a transcription of the letter in the photographs published here from artist Elmer MacRae to Constant Holley, dated February 14, 1898. MacRae was an artist, and boarder at the Holley House, which Constant helped run with her parents. Elmer and Constant fell in love, married in 1900, had twin girls in 1904, and ran the boarding house together.

Our curator Karen Frederick described the letters as such in a recent article in The New York Times: “Their letters are so lovey-dovey I can only stand reading them for a little while.”  🙂

Valentine's Day letter 1898 page 1

February 14, 1898 letter page 2Holley-MacRae Family Papers Box 6/96

Monday before dinner

[New York, February 14, 1898]

My darling Constant—

Monday and Tuesday have come and gone!—Saturday will soon come, my precious, then will we see each other again, and have each other for some time; until Saturday darling we must try to be patient and make the best of our time, so that by doing this each week, it will shorten the time when we can see each other and have each other for good and all time!

Sweet girl, you pass the time doing good to everybody when the opportunity offers, by making something pretty or whatever you might choose to improve your timing (Ed. ?), anything shall; keep occupied darling, and in this way the days, between our being together, won’t seem so long. There is hardly much use of me telling you this, sweetheart, I know you are always busy, always useful, always putting your time to some good account, but in this way I find the time isn’t quite so hard to bear.

In doing this both together, we are building the foundation stones of our union upon something solid. By that time we will be able, if necessity calls, to stand separation or any trial that might possibly come to us.

It will make us better men and better women.

Our beautiful and all powerful love, my darling, will carry us through everything and crown us with success and happiness to the end.

You sweet, loving girl, I worship and adore you—you’re my own true love!

Elmer sends his love to enrich her and stay by her all the time during his absence, and loves her constant companion wherever she goes or where she is.

Let me kiss you darling and put my arms around you—

[6 circles of kisses]

Greenwich Historical Society. Holley/MacRae Family Papers, Box 25, Folder 245. Elmer and Constant MacRae, Anniversary 1950
Elmer and Constant MacRae, fiftieth wedding anniversary, 1950

Treasures Found During Excavation

Items found during excavationThe Greenwich Historical Society has begun its campus transformation ! First steps include removing rock, excavating, and preparing our parking area under the Mianus River Bridge of I-95 to double parking capacity and create a single, accessibe entrance.

Tea kettle found during excavationOur parking lot excavation has turned up quite a few interesting items, from a tea kettle to a (full and unopened!) laxative bottle with dosage directions etched in the glass. Here are some photos of what we’ve found so far. They all have been buried for  approximately 100 years.

Items found during excavationconstruction vehicles

 

 

Bush-Holley House at Christmastime

‘Tis the season! Photos of the Greenwich Historical Society campus decorated for the holidays:

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Christmas garland on the porch of Bush-Holley House

 

Cardinal decorationBush-Holley House Interior Decorated for the Holidays

Every December, Bush-Holley House is decorated in a historically accurate way with an ornamented tree, fir garlands, and stockings by the fireplace.

Christmas was not widely celebrated during the Bush family years as Puritans considered Christmas traditions derived from pagan rituals. By the time the Holleys occupied the house though, Christmas traditions included a tree, visiting friends and family, presents, and special meals. 

 

What is now called Bush-Holley House was built in stages starting ca.1730. Beginning in 1738 the house was owned by the Bush (Dutch, originally Bosch; no relation to the political Bushes) family.

Its life as a boardinghouse began in 1848 when the now much-expanded home passed out of the Bush family. Josephine and Edward Holley operated it as a boardinghouse for artists and writers beginning in 1882 and passed it to their daughter Constant Holley following her marriage to the artist Elmer MacRae in 1900.

Christmas was popularized starting with the publication of Clement Clarke Moore’s “A Visit from Saint Nicholas” in 1822 and later with a photo of Queen Victoria and her family around a table-top Christmas tree in 1847. As the 19th century came to a close, it was becoming more common for trees to be full size with all the trimmings rather than small table-top displays.

Christmas 1910 at Bush-Holley House, with MacRae twins Clarissa and Constant, daughters of Constant Holley and artist Elmer MacRae

Living at the Holley house in 1910 were Constant (age 39) and Elmer (age 35); their twin daughters, Clarissa and Constant (age 6); Constant’s parents, Edward P. Holley (age 72) and Josephine (age 61); Sally Hudson (age 26), an African-American servant; and, according to the 1910 census, two roomers—Isabel Fowler (age 44) and Carolyn Mase (age 42).

Antique Christmas card in the collections of the Greenwich Historical Society’s William E. Finch, Jr., Archives

 

Greyledge & Colonel Bolling

Raynal BollingGreyledge, an English-style manor in Greenwich on Doubling Road, was designed by the same firm that created the New York Public Library, Carrère & Hastings. Built for pioneer aviator Col. Raynal Cawthorne Bolling, who moved in with his family in 1915, it was demolished in 2007.

Greenwich Historical Society. Raynal C. Bolling Collection. Image of Greyledge scanned from "The American Architect", December 13, 1916, Volume CX, Number 2138. Theodore E. Blake, architectGreenwich Historical Society. Scan of loaned photograph of interior of Greyledge, home of Raynal C. Bolling and family. Entrance to Big Porch from hall between Library & Music Room.

A Harvard (1900) and Harvard Law (1902) graduate, Bolling rose to become General Solicitor at U.S. Steel. Foreseeing the role of aircraft in the predicted U.S. involvement in what was to become World War I, with a small group of friends he learned to fly then organized our country’s first National Guard flying unit and helped recruit and train some of America’s earliest fighter pilots, creating the precursor to the Air Force Reserve Command.

Greenwich Historical Society. Scan of loaned photograph of interior of Greyledge, home of Raynal C. Bolling and family. View of living room ("library") into dining room.

In the war he was responsible for, among other things, recommending and sourcing aircraft Raynal C. Bollingand overseeing training and supplies. In France on March 26, 1918, he was ambushed by Germans. While defending his unarmed driver, Bolling was killed, the first high-ranking air service officer to die in battle in World War I.

Bolling received the Distinguished Service Medal from the U.S. Army and the French Legion of Honour. Bolling Air Force Base (known today as Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling) in Washington, D.C., was named for him.

Bolling MemorialThere’s a life-size statue of him on Greenwich Avenue, across from the World War I memorial.

The archives at the Greenwich Historical Society holds the Col. Raynal C. Bolling Papers, which contain primary source material documenting some of his Air Service work during the war, related printed material and a limited number of family papers.