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Greenwich Landmarks Series

This year marks the 25th anniversary of the Greenwich Historical Society's Landmark program, formerly known as "Signs of the Times." The program was created in 1987 to recognize, document and preserve the architectural heritage of Greenwich. Since then, the Historical Society has plaqued nearly 300 homes from Colonial to Post-modernist structures, both public and private. Participating homeowners receive a bronze plaque, documentation in the form of a title search and a narrative highlighting architectural details–and the sometimes-surprising history of previous occupants.

As part of the celebration to mark this milestone, Susan Nova, longtime real estate columnist for the Greenwich Time, will be partnering with the Historical Society to produce an article each month that will feature a historically significant home plaqued by the Historical Society.

In colorful narrative, Nova will examine the historical features of the homes, look at their transformation over time to suit the changing needs of their owners, relate tales of past owners, feature interviews with current homeowners and examine the experience of living in and preserving a historic home.

Overall, the series will trace the architectural heritage of Greenwich over time and explore the importance of these homes as part of our historic landscape. In telling the stories of these homes, the Historical Society hopes to generate a greater awareness of architectural preservation and to emphasize the vital part they play in continuing to tell the story of our unique community and its colorful past.

Cross Roads >

Denbigh Farm >

Dingletown Church >

Easterly >

Greenwich's First Post Office >

Joseph Lyon House>

Joshua Reynolds House >

Justice Sackett House >

Hencken >

Leander and Livingston Burns Homes >

The Real Estate Legacy of Greenwich’s Nathaniel Witherell >

Mills-Fitch House >

North Street School >

Quintard Homestead >

Solomon Merritt House >

Stonehenge >

The Homestead >

William Field House >

Yasukata Murai Home >

The articles were featured in the greenwich.patch.com.