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Past Exhibitions

Indian Harbor, built by “Commodore” E.C. Benedict, 1895, on an-80 acre waterfront peninsula. The home and outbuildings were designed by Carrere & Hastings , who collaborated with renowned Olmstead, Olmstead & Eliot on the landscape. The home, although modified, still stands today.

By 1921 Greenwich, Connecticut had the highest per capita income in the country. How did what was once a quiet, rural, coastal community of farmers, shopkeepers and oystermen become an enclave for the rich and powerful that would rival Newport, Rhode Island in wealth? This exhibition draws on the Greenwich Historical Society’s collection of clothing, photographs and objects to explore the era between 1880 and 1930–a period marked by unbridled spending by America’s elite to build estates of staggering proportions–to examine how the transformation impacted the people and cultural landscape of the town to this day.

gabelli funds

The New Spirit and the Cos Cob Art Colony:
Before and After The Armory Show

From October 9, 2013 to January 12, 2014

As the centenary for the monumental 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art (the Armory Show) approaches, the Greenwich Historical Society will mark this momentous historic milestone in American art with an exhibition exploring the involvement of and the effect on the exhibiting artists of the Cos Cob art colony.

The Armory Show exposed the American art world, the public, and the press to the progressive innovators of European art for the first time. Works from Paul Cézanne to Pablo Picasso were presented alongside a wide range of works by American artists. The introduction of their radical new ideas heralded a new aesthetic and a wider acceptance of Modernism, yet no exhibition to date has explored the direct effect that the Armory Show had on artists and their artistic production.

The New Spirit and the Cos Cob Art Colony will follow the story of the Armory show—and the results of exhibiting European art, both historic and ultra-modern—alongside American art. By highlighting selected works by the Cos Cob artists from before and after the Armory Show, this exhibition will illustrate how modernism became more widely assimilated into the mainstream of American art. The show will be comprised of about 40 works of art, including a few that were shown in the 1913 Armory Show, along with archival materials and ephemera from the Greenwich Historical Society, major museums and private collections.

The exhibition will focus on Cos Cob artists D. Putnam Brinley, Childe Hassam, Ernest Lawson, Elmer MacRae, Carolyn C. Mase, Frank A. Nankivell, Henry Fitch Taylor, Allen Tucker, Alden Twachtman and J. Alden Weir, and will look at the impact that the Armory Show had on those who continued to work after the exhibition. The exhibition will also include influential pioneering artists, Theodore Robinson and John H. Twachtman, whose work was included in the Armory Show but who had died years earlier.

A number of Greenwich-area artists played important roles in the actual production of the Armory Show: MacRae and Taylor were two of the four artists who conceived the idea for the exhibition in 1911; Brinley, Lawson, Tucker, and Weir were charter members of the Association of American Painters and Sculptors (AAPS), the organizing body of the Armory Show; and Brinley, Lawson, MacRae, Nankivell, Taylor, and Tucker all served as members of various committees.*

It is especially fitting for the Greenwich Historical Society to organize and mount this anniversary exhibition. Cos Cob artist Elmer MacRae, who lived and painted at the Historical Society’s Bush-Holley House, served as treasurer for the Armory Show, and the Greenwich Historical Society is a major repository for archival material from the Armory show as well as a major holder of works by MacRae, many of which will be on display.

A catalogue will accompany the exhibition with an essay by guest curator Valerie Ann Leeds.

The exhibition will complement related projects celebrating the Armory Show centennial being organized by other area institutions, such as The New-York Historical Societythe Archives of American Art, and the Montclair Art Museum, the Heckscher Museum of Art and the Phillips Collection, each of which focuses on a different aspect of this watershed event in the history of American art.

*The founding members of the Association of American Painters and Sculptors were: Karl Anderson; George Bellows; D. Putnam Brinley; J. Mowbray-Clarke; Leon Dabo; Jo Davidson; Arthur B. Davies; Guy Pène du Bois; Sherry Fry; William Glackens; Robert Henri; E A. Kramer; Walt Kuhn; Ernest Lawson; Jonas Lie; George Luks; Elmer MacRae; Jerome Myers; Frank Nankivell; Bruce Porter; Maurice Prendergast; John Sloan; Henry Fitch Taylor; Allen Tucker; and Mahonri Young.

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Greenwich: The Perspective of Time

July 17 – September 1, 2013

Greenwich: The Perspective of Time was a collaboration between the Greenwich Historical Society and The Stamford Photography Club. The show, comprised of juried images, was the result of an invitation by the Historical Society to members of The Stamford Photography Club to submit photographs that portrayed aspects of Greenwich history through the eye of the lens. 

The varied and fascinating images represented a visual commentary on the ever-changing face of the community and how structures, landscapes and institutions of Greenwich as they appear today may not survive the next generation. Executive Director, Debra Mecky commenting on the concept, noted “Since its invention, photography has been an invaluable medium for chronicling historical events. But photography can also raise the understanding of history to another level by evoking a feeling of time and place on a more visceral level.”

The Stamford Photography Club (originally the Stamford Camera Club, founded in 1945) provides a meeting ground for photographers of all levels. The organization regularly holds classes and conducts competitions in a variety of categories, and offers support, advice and avenues for display to photographers.

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From Italy to America

From March 1 to June 30, 2013

This show celebrated the rich cultural heritage of the Italian American community in Greenwich. It included historic images, objects, memorabilia and documents unearthed from the attics and family coffers of town residents, gathered through a series of events held throughout town at which the public was invited to share family stories and treasures.

The exhibition featured video interviews with local residents who recounted memories of the events, traditions and individuals (many whose relatives came as laborers to help build the town’s great estates) that shaped life in the early Italian American neighborhoods and that later came to influence the larger community. The video segments were produced by TimeStories, a video biography production company founded by Emmy Award-winning creative director Peter Savigny.

Also on view was a complementary exhibition of 26 black and white photographs by Anthony Riccio drawn from his show From Italy to America, originally organized by the Bellarmine Museum of Art (Fairfield University, Fairfield, Connecticut).

Learn more! To see interviews about the exhibition with photographer Anthony Riccio, curator Kathie Bennewitz and archivist Christopher Shields click here.

Sponsored by:ct humanities council logo time stories logo

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A Good Light: The Artist’s Studio in Cos Cob and Beyond

October 3, 2012 to January 6, 2013

To celebrate the restoration of the room in Bush-Holley House that served at various times as the studio of Childe Hassam, John Twachtman and Elmer MacRae, the Greenwich Historical Society presented an exhibition exploring the changing concept of the artist’s studio. Representations of an American art student’s Parisian garret, William Merritt Chase’s opulent Tenth Street studio in New York, Dorothy Ochtman’s view of her father in the studio they shared in their Cos Cob home and the repurposed farm sheds used by artists in Old Lyme: these and other paintings suggest the wide range of spaces in which turn-of-the-century artists worked and provide a cultural context for our own restored studio. The exhibition also presented the models for Childe Hassam’s work in Cos Cob and a sampling of work done outside the studio by Hassam, John H. Twachtman and Elmer MacRae.

A separate gallery was devoted to a travelling exhibition on loan from Chesterwood, (the home and studio of Daniel Chester French, sculptor of the Lincoln monument). Historic Artists’ Homes & Studios featured culturally and artistically diverse photographs of the “intimate living and work spaces” of famous American artists including (among others) the N.C. Wyeth House and Studio, the Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center, and the Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site.

Generously funded by Deborah and Chuck Royce and
ct humanities council logo

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New Century, New Eyes, An Exhibition Celebrating the 100th Anniversary of the Greenwich Art Society

Elmer MacRae in His Studio at Bush-Holley House

October 24 through November 18, 2012

The Greenwich Art Society was established in 1912, and its first secretary was none other than former Bush-Holley House resident and artist Elmer MacRae. To celebrate this centennial anniversary, the Greenwich Historical Society is partnering with the Greenwich Art Society to host a special exhibition that looks at the “Old House” with new eyes.

The premise of this unique exhibit was to ask artists to create contemporary works inspired by Bush-Holley’s period rooms, gardens and artifacts–just as Elmer MacRae and his Cos Cob art colony contemporaries did a century ago. The fascinating results range widely in style and media and include works in paint, pastels, modeled clay and paper, as well as collage, fabric, embroidery thread, and digital imagery. The works will be displayed in the Vanderbilt Education Center and the Bush-Holley House from October 24 through November 18, 2012. The public is welcome to the opening reception on October 24, from 5:30 to 7:30 pm.

Kathryn Shorts, Vase, Bush-Holley House

Kathryn Shorts
Vase, Bush-Holley House
oil

Mary Newcomb
Happy Peonies Under Window
acrylic on paper

Peg Benison
Journey to Color

digital collage

Carol Nipomnich Dixon
Sharing a Palette
oil paint and photo collage on wood

Kathie Milligan, 
The Storehouse,
oil

The juried show was coordinated by the Greenwich Historical Society and by Greenwich Art Society Board Members Michelle Rudolph and Carol Nipomnich Dixon along with by co-chairs Kathryn Shorts and Valerie O’Halpin. Award Judges were Leslee Asch, Executive Director Silvermine Arts Center; Angela Vecchio, artist and creative director, GNF Marketing; and Karen Frederick, Greenwich Historical Society curator and exhibitions coordinator.

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Everyday Heroes: Greenwich First Responders

September 14, 2011 through August 26, 2012

In today’s parlance, the term “first responder” is associated with trained emergency professionals, but originally it meant literally the first person to respond in a crisis. This exhibition chronicles the history of Greenwich’s Fire, Police and Emergency Medical Services beginning with General Putman, one of Greenwich’s “first” first responders who, in 1779, rode to warn of invading British troops and whose image now appears on the Town seal, as well as on Greenwich’s Fire and Police Department badges.

The show delves into headline-making Greenwich disasters from 1873 to 2010, such as the Greenwich Avenue conflagration of 1936 and the Mianus River Bridge collapse in 1983, looks at the way first responders worked together to respond to these incidents and at how first response protocols have evolved as a result of experience and technology. At the very heart of the exhibition is an exploration of values underlying civic service, collaboration and acts of heroism by ordinary men and women who face the prospect of being called upon to risk their lives each day. Visitors will be asked to decide in their own minds what qualities define a hero.

Everyday Heroes has been three years in the making. The idea was originally put forth by the Historical Society’s Collection Curator Karen Frederick and former Curator of Library and Archives Anne Young. The Historical Society worked with Greenwich Police, Fire and Emergency Medical Services representatives as well as town officials and community focus groups to further hone the show’s content. Along with objects, photos and ephemera from the Greenwich Historical Society collection and loans from the collections of the Fire, Police and GEMS Departments, Everyday Heroes features interactive elements including a revolving timeline and a hands-on gallery where kids can try on real equipment and learn what it takes to become a first responder. A simulated dispatch center punctuates how “sounding the alarm” has changed over time and includes an opportunity to “make” or “answer” a 911 call.

In the initial stages of the exhibition’s development, the Historical Society received planning and development grants from the Connecticut Humanities Council; a subsequent $50,000 grant was given in recognition of the exhibition’s educational and community outreach potential. An Exhibition Patrons Council also was established by the Historical Society to solicit funding, and Moffly Media will be the exclusive media sponsor for Everyday Heroes and its adult and family-related programs planned throughout the run of the exhibition. 

made possible by a grant from the CT Humanities Council

moffly

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From This Day Forward: Looking Back at Greenwich Weddings
September 29, 2010 to March 6, 2011

Stitch in Time: Quilts from the Collection
March 3 to June 13, 2010 

Once Upon a Page: Illustrations by Cos Cob Artists
October 3, 2007 to January 6, 2008

Cherishing Our Past: Preserving Greenwich History
January 17 to June 30, 2007

John Twachtman (1853-1902): A Painter's Painter
July 13 to October 29, 2006

Greenwich By Design: Visionary Architecture and Landscapes
January 25 to May 21, 2006

Cos Cob's Surprising Modernist: Henry Fitch Taylor
September 30 to December 31, 2005

Flowers in Nature and Art: Constant Holley and Elmer MacRae
May 11 to September 4, 2005

Intimate Strangers: Slavery and Freedom in Fairfield County, 1700-1850
October 15, 2004 to April 17, 2005

Childe Hassam: Impressions of Cos Cob
June 1 to September 5, 2004

"No to UNOville!" Greenwich and the Origins of the United Nations
October 24, 2003 to March 28, 2004