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Life and Art in the News

News

Delayed Debuts in LA and Greenwich

The Magazine Antiques | 2022

In Connecticut, the Greenwich Historical Society has finally been able to mount Life and Art: The Greenwich Paintings of John Henry Twachtman. The show was meant to go on view last fall, but that plan was scotched thanks to flooding caused by Hurricane Ida. The exhibition examines the artworks created by the American impressionist while living in a farmhouse in Greenwich.

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News

The Glory of Greenwich

Art and Antiques | November 2022

THROUGH January 22 the Greenwich Historical Society will stage a major exhibition for impressionist John Henry Twachtman featuring his home and surroundings in Greenwich, Connecticut. The famed artist lived in the area from 1890 through 1899 and is considered to be when he painted some of his best-known works. The show, titled “Life and Art: The Greenwich Paintings of John Henry Twachtman”, was curated by Lisa N. Peters, Ph.D., an independent scholar and author on several Twachrman and American art publications.

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News

Life & Art: The Greenwich Paintings Of John Henry Twachtman

COS COB, CONN. – “I can see how necessary it is to live always in the country – at all seasons of the year.” American Impressionist John Henry Twachtman (1853-1902) shared this certainty with close friend and fellow artist Julian Alden Weir in 1891, a few days after adding acreage to his small farmstead in Greenwich, Conn. Twachtman’s guiding belief in the inspirational power of place and nature shines through the exhibition and catalog titled “Life and Art: The Greenwich Paintings of John Henry Twachtman.” Visitors can take in the intriguing presentation at the Greenwich Historical Society in Cos Cob until January 22.

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News

John Henry Twachtman Adopts Greenwich

By Maggie Dimock | Connecticut Explored Inc. | Summer 2022

In a letter scribbled on stationery from The Players club in New York in the winter of 1902, now held in the Holley-MacRae Papers in the collection of the Greenwich Historical Society, American Impressionist artist John Henry Twachtman (1853 – 1902) put into words the dislocation and exhaustion of city living: “I wish I were back. The town is using me up. I am on the go from morning until night and nothing doing. Always busy about some damned unnecessary thing and spending money to beat the band and to no purpose. And I also miss the painting.”

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News

On its way to its 100th, the Greenwich Historical Society to celebrate its 90th anniversary In a Gatsbyesque setting

By Anne W. Semmes | Greenwich Sentinel | July 15, 2022
Come to a unique dinner-dance event to celebrate 90 years of service to the community. Taking place on the grounds of the neoclassical Beaux Arts-style waterfront estate, Easterly, circa 1902. A giant tent will evoke the glamorous Café Society, so transformed into the famed zebra-striped New York El Morocco nightclub. Inside, guests will be dancing to the tunes of Cole Porter and George Gershwin.

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News

Take a Walk on the Historical Side

By Ali Muldoon | Greenwich Sentinel | July 8, 2022
When Covid-19 hit, the Greenwich Historical Society was determined to continue to preserve and disseminate the history of Greenwich. To achieve this goal, the group compiled a plethora of self-guided walking tours rich with information on what Greenwich was like before Lululemon and Saks 5th Avenue.

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News

Connecticut Idyll

Thomas Connors | The Magazine Antiques | January 3, 2022

Home. For most of us, it is the heart’s happy place. For creative types, it can be prison or paradise, a cage that keeps one from working, or the setting where one works best. And then there are those like Frank Lloyd Wright and Claude Monet. The architect’s estate, Taliesin, in the hills of the Wisconsin countryside, was both abode and manifesto—a working studio and classroom, where acolytes gathered and often gave their all to learn from the ever-confident master. Monet turned his home in the French village of Giverny into a place both of this world and apart from it—a garden of the artist’s mind as much as of the earth.

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